Twenty’s plenty for Kilburn

Labour Camden is seeking to introduce a 20mph speed limit across the whole of the borough in a bid to cut accidents on our busy roads.

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Just a small reduction in speeds prevents accidents and saves lives. Department of Transport statistics show that for every one mile per hour reduction in speed, accidents drop by six percent on average.

The bold move to be the first London council to introduce borough-wide speed limit has already attracted the attention of BBC London.

The new limit, if agreed, would apply to all borough roads under Camden control. Camden would also initiate discussions with Transport for London regarding other roads, including the ‘red routes’ that they control. There will be an opportunity to discuss this – and other transport issues at a public meeting with the Deputy Mayor for transport on Wednesday.

Given some of the tragic road accidents we’ve seen on our roads locally, especially on Kilburn High Road, this has to be a welcome move. A borough-wide rule would also ensure a more consistent environment for drivers who would no longer have to move confusingly between borough roads with different speed limits.

Generating a culture of safer driving on all our roads will make them safer for pedestrians, cyclists and other drivers – and could also pay dividends for everyone’s health in terms of improved air quality.

Cllr Phil Jones, cabinet member for sustainability, says: “We want to give greater confidence to the pedestrians and cyclists who use our roads and encourage more people to switch to sustainable forms of transport.”

“This is not about introducing more road humps,” he stresses, “it is about beginning to change the culture on our roads in favour of lower speeds. We will continue with small local schemes where they are supported by residents, but this is a more comprehensive proposal that would be implemented without major traffic calming measures.”

A report will be considered by the council’s Cabinet in December and, if agreed, will be followed by a public consultation on the plans.

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